What Happened to Motherwell’s Pink?

© Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY; used with permission

Robert Motherwell, “Pancho Villa Dead and Alive,” 1943 (MOMA/Dedalus Foundation)

Should collage artists worry about papers fading over time?  This question was prompted by a hugely informative post by artist/teacher Nancy Nikkal about the  recent Robert Motherwell exhibition at MOMA —  which I blogged about in “How Robert Motherwell Lost His Dada Cred.”

So…did Motherwell coat his papers on both sides with PVA?  I don’t think they even had PVA in 1946.  But should I be using it now?

Not being an art school grad, I have wondered about  this issue.  Some collage instruction books tell you it’s essential to protect your papers unchanged for eternity.  Was I being too lackadaisical about this? Continue reading

Exquisite Corpse Collage

A peek inside my bag of collage papers

A peek inside my bag of collage papers

A cafe in Paris, 1925. Suddenly, a little guy with a monocle jumps up at his table, crying “Follow me.” A “prime collection of zanies” leap to their feet, dashing out without paying for their coffee.

Out in the streets of Paris, the monocled guy—–like the Pied Piper———-leads the rest. “Solemnfaced,” they march, “executing a number of idiotic maneuvers.” All the while, they’re chanting: Dada, Dada, Dada.”

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How Robert Motherwell Lost His DADA Cred

https://i1.wp.com/www.guggenheim.org/images/content/New_York/press_room/photo_service/Motherwell/motherwell_9thstreetexhibition_490.jpg

Robert Motherwell, “Jeune Fille,” 1944 Oil, ink, gouache, and pasted Kraft drawing paper, colored paper, Japanese paper, German decorative paper, and fabric on canvas board.

That headline needs some ‘splainin’, as Ricky Ricardo used to say.    First,  Dada—————-the more radical offshoot of Surrealism.   Dada was thought up after World War I by a bunch of punk writers and artists in Europe.  Okay, they didn’t use the word “punk.” But they were rebels. They flirted with nihilism. They wanted to shock.
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